Super Awesome Science Show: Lies

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On this week’s Super Awesome Science Show, we’re talking about lies.

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Humans tend to communicate in a number of ways apart from verbal expression. We use our arms, our posture and other gestures to convey what we’re thinking. But did you ever imagine that we may be able to code these movements so that we know what another person is feeling? Now add the fact that the subject of this classification isn’t our arms or the way we stand, it’s small movements of the face. Sounds almost impossible, right?

Well, this does exist, and on this week’s show, we’re devoting the entire episode to the man who has spent the last 60 years deciphering our hidden movements and turning them into information we can use. His name is Paul Ekman, and if you ever watched the TV show Lie To Me then you know who he is.


READ MORE:
Guilty of telling little white lies? Research shows that will only lead to bigger, more deceitful lies

Ekman has been one of those rogue researchers who comes around every now and then and manages to change our entire society. We first look at how he managed to shift from the standard types of psychology back in the 1950s and ’60s to develop an entirely new branch that has, over the last half-century, become a staple worldwide. His story has a bit of a Hollywood twist to it that definitely makes you believe dreams can come true.


READ MORE:
Lying liars — Scientists say politicians lie more often than you do

As for the branch of research, it all has to do with being able to tell emotions through facial movements. Every time we hear something or share our thoughts, our bodies perform small and fast facial gestures, which he calls microexpressions. These may be completely missed by an untrained eye, but Ekman developed a means to identify how our anatomy can be used as an emotion detector. It eventually led to his ultimate goal of being able to identify deception and even malice in a person.


READ MORE:
Twitter loves lies — False info travels faster than the truth, study finds

Paul’s work is now being shared all over the world to help a variety of people — from sales professionals to airport security personnel — determine what a person is thinking even if the truth is left unsaid.

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Contact:

Twitter: @JATetro
Email: thegermguy@gmail.com

Guests:

Paul Ekman
Twitter: @PaulEkman
Web: https://www.ekmaninternational.com/

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